(Video) What You Need to Know about Buying Seafood

Unfortunately the process of buying good quality Seafood has become more difficult. Not only has pollution hurt the habitat for fish but fish farms are some of the unhealthiest places on the planet. Here is an indepth article by Dr. Joseph Mercola about buying Seafood and how to determine what is good versus deceptive product labeling. Check it out and share with your family and friends.

By Dr. Mercola

It’s a sad fact that we’ve more or less made an entire healthy food group toxic due to manmade pollution.

With just a few exceptions, most seafood is contaminated with environmental pollutants such as mercury and PCBs, and farmed seafood is typically fed antibiotics and other drugs.

In most respects, fish and shrimp farms are riddled with the same problems as land-based confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs), which include disease-promoting overcrowding, unnatural diets, and environmental pollution.

Even shrimp, which due to their small size have been considered one of the safer kinds of seafood in terms of contamination, are not recommended unless you can verify that it’s wild-caught from a clean source—and therein lies the problem.

What you see on the label isn’t always what you get, as many shrimp products are mislabeled and completely misrepresented.

Seafood Fraud Is Big Business

Last year, a report1,2 by the ocean conservation group Oceana revealed that over 30 percent of shrimp products sold in US grocery stores and restaurants are misrepresented. Fifteen percent were mislabeled in regard to production method (farm-raised or wild-caught) or species.

Farmed species were often labeled as “Gulf shrimp,” and different species were often mixed together in one bag, or otherwise mislabeled. One sample of frozen shrimp salad even contained a type of aquarium pet shrimp that is not intended for human consumption.

Ironically, if you’re looking for wild-caught shrimp, you may be best off purchasing products labeled simply as “shrimp,” as two-thirds of such packages contained wild-caught Gulf shrimp, while more than one-third of those labeled as “Gulf shrimp” were actually farm-raised!

Fish are also frequently misrepresented and mislabeled, and the ramifications can be more serious than simply overpaying for an inferior product. In an earlier test, published in 2013, Oceana3 discovered that 84 percent of white tuna sampled from US retail outlets were actually escolar—a fish that can cause severe digestive problems.

As noted by The Atlantic,4 seafood fraud is costing Americans an estimated $25 billion annually. But why misrepresent seafood?

For starters, less than one percent of imported seafood is inspected for mislabeling, and seafood businesses can avoid paying higher anti-dumping tariffs by misrepresenting the seafood being imported.

In one case, passing off Asian catfish as grouper saved the company more than $60 million in such tariffs.5 Grouper also sells for about four times the amount as catfish, so money is to be made on the resale end as well.

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